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© 2016 All Rights Reserved.  Proudly created for our dogs. Webmaster Steven Venegas

JOINING OUR CLUB

Dear Prospective Member:

 

Thank you for inquiring about membership in the Anacapa Working Dogs Association. Our primary goal is to promote Schutzhund training.

Is Schutzhund For You?

 

Schutzhund is a fun and rewarding sport for you and your dog. However, it is very time consuming. Training a dog from scratch to an IPO 3 can take several years depending on ability (yours and your dog’s) and the time you put into it. Few dogs excel in all three phases of the sport, and training problems always crop up. The sport requires patience and good sportsmanship. We expect our members to treat their dogs fairly. Abusive training methods will not be tolerated.

 

Success in Schutzhund comes through team effort. We expect our members to help one another and to respect other club members, trainers and judges. We expect everyone to pitch in with club tasks, including helping with club events. Since membership is limited, we will give preference to handlers who are serious about achieving Schutzhund titles and who have dogs capable of obtaining these titles. Many people join Schutzhund clubs only to drop out within their first year when they become discouraged over the amount of time required or their perceived lack of progress. We want our investment of time and energy to be a wise one.

Temperament Testing

 

We will make an honest assessment of your dog during the invitational sessions and tell you whether your dog is suited for the sport. A stable temperament is foremost. Your dog will be evaluated for its reaction to people, other dogs and its surroundings. This can be quite overwhelming, so please don’t write your dog off after one session -- we don’t!

 

Schutzhund is not for dogs with weak nerves or very low drive. The training coordinator will observe and evaluate your relationship with the dog and its drive. Does it enjoy playing tug-of-war? Does it love to chase a ball? Please understand that these evaluations aren’t meant to hurt anyone’s feelings; they are an honest appraisal of the potential of the dog in this sport. Sometimes this means that a young dog simply needs time to grow up. Sometimes a dog doesn’t have the heart to participate. This doesn’t mean it isn’t a perfectly wonderful companion.

The First Four Visits

 

As a prospective new member you are asked to come with your dog at least four times in a short period of time. During these sessions you and club members will get to know one another. Our trainers will evaluate your dog and you can observe from the sidelines, socialize, and participate in some of the activities. Prospective members must show initiative and willingness to work with the club. In addition, prospective members and their dogs must fit in with the other club members.

 

After four visits the training coordinator will determine the suitability of the dog for the sport by making one of three conclusions:

 

1. The dog’s temperament is not suited to the sport, and/or the handler does not show willingness to train or socialize the dog appropriately.

2. Suitable, at which time the applicant will be invited to continue to attend training sessions. If membership is full, the applicant will be placed on a waiting list. We will contact you when slots open up. In the meantime, we encourage you to continue training at some of the places listed below.

3. Suitability undetermined. The dog may show promise but still be questionable. The training coordinator will advise as to the time frame to re-evaluate the dog at no additional fee. The evaluation will continue until the training coordinator reaches either conclusion 1 or 2 above.

Training Schedule

 

Schutzhund training consists of obedience, tracking, and protection. Visit our Events page to view our current training schedule. Please Contact us before coming so that we can inform you of the correct locations and times.

 

We encourage prospective members to watch, listen, pay attention and enjoy the training sessions. Quite often you will pick up much information by watching other people train.

 

Please print and sign our risk waiver and bring this with you on your first visit. Click Here to Download

Basic Information for Guests

IMPORTANT -- Read before you visit

 

For Your Safety & Comfort

 

1. Visitors MUST bring proof of rabies and DHLPP (or equivalent) for adult dogs. Puppies under six months must have proof of at least sets of DHLPP (or equivalent) vaccinations.

 

2. For your first visits to the club, you’ll need a prong or fur saver collar, flat collar, lightweight leash, soft food treats, motivational toys, and a crate.

 

3. The handler is to be in control of the dog at all times.

 

4. Safety is our number one priority. Do not allow your dog to contact another dog without the handler’s permission. If your dog is dog aggressive, do not approach at all.

 

5. Wear comfortable clothes that you don’t mind getting dirty. Pockets are useful. Shoes must be closed-toed and have good traction.

 

6. Have water on hand for yourself and your dog. Ice is a plus.

 

7. During protection work, all dogs not on the field must be confined to a crate or other safe place unless the training coordinator directs otherwise.

 

8. Bring your own folding chair, sunscreen, jackets, treat bags, rain-wear, and bug spray.

 

9. Your dog should eliminate prior to training in the designated potty area, never on the Schutzhund field. Handlers who allow their dogs to eliminate on the field must make a $5 donation to the club. Please clean up after your dog.

 

Training Schedule

 

Schutzhund training consists of obedience, tracking, and protection. Visit our Events page to view our current training schedule. Please Contact us before coming so that we can inform you of the correct locations and times. 

 

We encourage guests to watch, listen, pay attention and enjoy the training sessions. Quite often you will pick up much information by watching other people train.

 

Please print and sign our risk waiver and bring this with you on your first visit. Click Here to Download

 

 

Training Equipment

 

1. Suggested collars (varies from dog to dog. See obedience instructor). Prong collar, size small for medium-sized dogs and medium for larger dogs. These are the best training collars for most dogs. Warning: Avoid quick release prong collars! They often release when you don’t want them to. Good quality prong collars (we recommend the Herm Sprenger brand) are available online.

 

2. Fur saver: Necessary for trialing. These are available on K-9 or Schutzhund web sites. Buy the lightest size. We recommend the Herm Sprenger brand.

 

3. 3’ or 4’ lead, lightweight, leather, fabric or synthetic. No chains. The leash should be thin and pliable enough for you to gather it in your hand.

 

4. Harness: Non-restrictive design for protection work.

 

5. Long line: 10-15 feet for protection.

 

6. Tracking line: 10 meters (33 feet) for tracking.

 

7. A steady supply of soft, high value dog training treats. Many of us use Natural Balance rolls of lamb, beef and turkey sold at pet supply stores. These are lower in sugar and salt than many pre-packaged treats and can be cut into bite-sized pieces.

 

8. Motivational toys. We recommend a ball on a string or tug toy about 12 inches long.

 

9. Electric collars are not permitted except by permission of the training coordinator.

 

10. Crate. Your dog must be confined when not on the training field. Be sure that you bring a shade for your kennel. Silver Shade seems to be the choice for our dogs comfort on a hot day. It reduces heat build up, It also reflects heat and allows breeze to come through. Click to order here or go to our Links page.

 

 

Training Tips

 

1. Handlers are encouraged to discuss any training questions or suggestions with the training coordinator or assistant.

 

2. We recommend that you train with your dog three to five times a week, 10-30 minutes per session depending on your dog's attention span and age and how fast you want to attain your training goal. We can assist you in training your dog, but you must be the dog trainer.

 

3. We encourage everyone to watch, listen, pay attention and enjoy the training sessions. Quite often you will pick up much information by watching other people train.

 

4. Occasionally we organize events, as they are excellent opportunities for socialization. For added control, your dog should wear his prong collar.

 

5. You may find some exercises too challenging for you or your dog. If so, please advise the instructor if you would prefer to take a break or not participate at all.